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20130224
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuts. does the economy have enough kick in it to withstand the sequester? and a big win for activist investor david einhorn in his fight to get apple to share the wealth, with its shareholders. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! if you get a paycheck, no doubt you have seen it shrink this year. higher payroll taxes have taken 2% out of working americans take home pay. at the same time, gasoline prices have been rising and fast. together, this cuts into the spending power of consumers, and that's bad news for a host of companies, from restaurants to retailers. erika miller reports on how some of these firms are trying to fight back against the pay pinch. >> reporter: virtually every worker in america is taking home 2% less in pay this year because of higher payroll taxes. that's not just bad for consumers, it's also bad for businesses. three out of four households are cutting spending to cope with lower pay. for one out of three households, it means eating out less. consumers are also changing where they dine. >> we are moving from casual dining, down to fast casual, down to the fast
the economy, by buying government bonds. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. can two weaklings become strong by teaming up. that's what office depot and office max are hoping for, as they decide to merge. >> tom: and a mixed picture on housing, contractors break ground on more single family homes, but pull back on building apartments and condos. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! how much longer should the federal reserve continue to stimulate the economy? that question was intensely debated at the central bank's policy meeting in january according to the minutes released today. stocks sold off on that news, as investors worry the fed might taper off its stimulus program, sooner than expected, and before its goal of seeing a big pick up in the job market. the fed has been buying $85 billion of mortgage backed securities and treasuries every month to pump up the economy. here's what those fed minutes revealed: "many" policymakers voiced concerns about "potential costs and risks" from more bond buying. others said that the easy-money policies might encourage "excessive risk-taking" a
. finance ministers and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds hol
, not bigger. >>> a growing economy that creates good middle class jobs, that must be the north star that guides our efforts. it is our generation's task then to reignite the true engine of american economic growth, a rising thriving middle class. >> president obama delivered his fourth state of the union address tuesday. in attendance were senate and house members, six of the nine justices of the supreme court, the joint chiefs of staff, members of this cabinet and assorted dignitaries. over the course of one hour, the president unveiled proposals to boost the economy, help the middlal class, invest in the nation's aging infrastructure, create more high-tech manufacturing, a big emphasis, expand preschool education, up high school standards and make college more affordable >> nothing i'm proposing tonight should increase our deficit by a single dime. it is not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth. >> the president also appeals to congress to work together on climate change, immigration reform, and particularly o
, they are not fair. they will hurt our economy. they will add hundreds of thousands of americans to the unemployment rolls. this is not an abstraction. people will lose their jobs. the unemployment rate might tick up again. >> president obama used his bully pulpit this week to call on congress to avoid, get this, sequestration. that's washington nomenclature for automatic spending cuts due to go into effect on march 1, next friday. on that date, both military and domestic programs will feel the impact of the monumental $85 billion cuts slated for this year, 2013, alone. not only does the president condemn the cuts, but his administration is also sounding the alarm. first, the secretary of state. >> but in these days of the looming budget sequester that everyone actually wants to avoid, or most, we can't be strong in the world unless we are strong at home. my credibility as a diplomat, working to help other countries create order is strongest when america at least puts its own fiscal house in order, and that has to be now. >> next, the secretary of defense. >> members of congress need to understand t
that our economy is no longer working for vast numbers of everyday people. the rich and powerful have more wealth and power than ever, everyone else keeps losing ground. between 2009 and 2011 alone, income fell for the 99%, while it rose 11% for the top 1%. since the worst of the financial crisis, all of the economic growth has gone to the top 1% while the rest of the country has floundered. stunning, isn't it? the behavior of many of those one percenters brought on the financial crisis in the first place. we turned around and rescued them, and now their wealth is skyrocketing once again. at the bottom, working people are practically flat on their back. president obama has finally recognized they need help. in his state of the union, he proposed an increase in the minimum wage. >> tonight let's declare that in the wealthiest nation on earth, no one who works full-time should have to live in poverty, and raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour. >> but as the economist dean baker points out this week, "if the minimum wage had risen in step with productivity growth, it would be over $16.
market, but she worries about long-term ramifications for the economy. >> i'm not so sure how much consolidation is actually good because that to me actually means job losses at the administrative level, factory level and even c.e.o. level. so-- i'm not that worried about the c.e.o.s, but still. >> reporter: this year, as m&a activity heats up, stocks have resisted a much talked about correction. the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all up a healthy amount. investment pro sam stovall says if the majority of deals are cash, as many have been in 2013, it suggests the m&a cycle is just getting started. >> it's later in the cycle when a lot of m&a activity takes place where it's purchased for stock. then companies are basically saying, "we think our stock is overvalued, let's use it while we can to buy the competition." >> reporter: there may be a lot more corporate marriages in the months ahead, but stovall says the stock market still needs to digest its recent gains. >> i think that we could end up seeing a relatively mild correction in prices, something on the order of 5% or maybe more.
creating new job. the u.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries about economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wheat hitting an eight-month low today. the thomson reuters-jefferies c.r.b. in
, masterminds of the mortgage-backed securities that almost sank the world economy. cantor's also the third largest recipient of money from the national rifle association in the house, which is one reason he's such a "big gun" there. senator robert menendez, democrat of new jersey, may be in hot water. he's currently under investigation for allegations that he improperly intervened with government agencies on behalf of a big donor. and there's fred upton, republican from michigan, chairman of the house energy and commerce committee. what a coincidence. the oil and gas industry is one of his top donors, helping him raise the $4 million dollars he spent last year to win re-election. senator kirsten gillibrand and senator chuck schumer, democrats of new york, have wall street as a constituent and patron. her biggest contributors include jpmorgan chase, morgan stanley, goldman sachs, and law firms that have advised them. his top donors include securities and investment firms, lawyers and legal firms, and lobbyists. and there are fleeting glances of some familiar faces here tonight seen recently
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)